Sanghoon Kim-Leffingwell

Sanghoon Kim-Leffingwell

Senior Lecturer and Program Coordinator

Johns Hopkins University

I am a Senior Lecturer and Program Coordinator (full-time faculty) with the Center for Advanced Governmental Studies at Johns Hopkins University. I received my PhD in Political Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2022. My research interests focus on authoritarian nostalgia and related political behavior in post-authoritarian democracies, especially East Asian countries. My book project investigates why individual voters feel nostalgic for an authoritarian past and vote for political parties that are linked to the past. My research has appeared in or is forthcoming at Party Politics and Political Communication.

My dissertation research was supported by various sources, including a Taiwan Fellowship from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Taiwan, a Doctoral Fellowship from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange, and multiple institutions at the University of Illinois, including Ferber & Sudman Dissertation Awards for Survey Research, a Nelle M. Signor Graduate Scholarship in International Relations, and a CEAPS Graduate Student Dissertation Travel Grant from Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies.

Interests

  • Authoritarian legacies
  • Comparative political behavior
  • Personality and political attitudes
  • Post-authoritarian democracies

Education

  • PhD in Political Science, 2022

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

  • MA in Political Science, 2016

    Korea University

  • BA in Political Science; Economics, 2011

    Korea University

Research

Book Project

Authoritarian Nostalgia in Democratic Voters: Authoritarian Nostalgia, Group Sentiment, and Voter Behavior

More than three decades has passed since the Third Wave of democratization when once-unassailable former dictatorships were replaced with new popular democracies from Eastern and Southern Europe to Latin America, Southeast Asia and to Northeast Asia. While the statues and statutes of former dictators have long been destroyed, nostalgia for the former dictatorship still drives individual political attitudes and related behavior in many democracies.

Research

Political Economy in East Asia

Teaching

Johns Hopkins University, Advanced Academic Programs

Instructor

  • AS470.669 Mathematics for Data Scientists (Fall 2022)
  • AS470.681 Probability and Statistics (Summer, Fall 2022)
  • AS470.768 Programming and Data Management (Summer 2022)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Instructor

  • PS230 Introduction to Political Research (Spring 2021, Spring 2022)
  • PS241 Comparative Politics in Developing Nations (Online, Spring 2020)
  • GLBL296 Global Politics of Intellectual Property Protection (Spring 2019)
  • PS100 Introduction to Political Science (Online, Spring 2019)

Teaching Assistant

I received the A. Belden Fields Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching as a Teaching Assisant in 2019. Teaching evaluations are available upon request.

  • PS231 Strategic Models (Fall 2020, Fall 2021)
  • PS241 Comparative Politics in Developing Nations (Spring 2018, Fall 2018)
  • PS220 Introduction to Public Policy (Fall 2017)
  • PS322 Law and Public Policy (Spring 2017)
  • PS321 Principles of Public Policy (Fall 2016)

ICPSR, University of Michigan

Teaching Assistant

  • Causal Inference for the Social Sciences (Summer 2021)